SIMON J. WILLIAMSON


Writer-Director - Actor

In the '80's and 90's, Simon was also one of the leading creature / movement performers in the UK, working with Jim Henson and George Lucas on large budget films, including playing Max Rebo in Star Wars III: RETURN OF THE JEDI, and Ursol in Jim Henson's groundbreaking film THE DARK CRYSTAL. He he continued his career as an actor before moving to writing and directing.

His first video drama, FOETAL ATTRACTION was Highly Commended at the BAVA Awards, and he won a prize at The Raindance Film Festival, for pitching MANXED, his low budget British comedy screenplay set on the Isle of Man. Another screenplay, THE FOLLOWERS, is being developed as a European Co-Production.

He wrote four short comedies for Paramount Comedy Channel, under the series title CONSPIRACY!, and directed two dramatised videos about dream-interpretation for The Readers Digest. (THE MEANING OF DREAMS 1 & 2).

He formed Fantasy Ridge Productions as a vehicle for his writing and directing and made THE SEARCH FOR DEEPA, a 45-minute spoof documentary about a charismatic and corrupt Indian guru, and a THE MODERN DANCE POSTMEN - as a pilot for a bizarre documentary sketch show. He made a short black comedy, THE UNDERSTUDY on DV. Another black comedy, FOOTBALL CRAZY is set to follow in 2004/2005.

His latest short film, THE RIGHT HAND MAN, a rites of passage drama set in Wales, is now complete and ready for the festival circuit.

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As an actor, Simon's West End theatre work includes Dario Fo's TRUMPETS & RASPBERRIES, ART and NEVILLE'S ISLAND. Shakespeare includes OTHELLO (Oxford) and MACBETH (Leicester Haymarket). He was Sagredo in Brecht'sTHE LIFE OF GALILEO (Young Vic), Victor Alfreds in THE THIRST ( Leicester Haymarket) and Charlie Bell in FRED KARNO'S ARMY (Bristol Old Vic). Television experience includes CASUALTY, LONDON'S BURNING, THE BILL, WAITING FOR GOD, CAMPION, and HANNAY. His voice has been heard narrating some 200 hours of audiobooks, ranging from biography to courtroom drama, by way of spy thrillers, and medieval whodunnit s.